Support and Training

Workshops and Trainings

Parent Support Group

Parent Support Group

West Virginia Parent Training and Information offers a variety of workshops and trainings for parents and professionals. The trainings last approximately two hours, but we can tailor training to support your request. Trainings and workshops not only provide information to empower parents/families, but it allows parents to connect with other parents who understand and either have or are going through similar situations. We look forward to seeing you at our trainings and workshop ... sign up today!

Parent Support GroupJoining a parent support group may help you develop in all areas of your life. It may even help you learn critical information and make new friends for you and your child. A support group is created to provide support and it is okay to take time out of the day to take care of yourself and relate to other parents. We hope these reasons will help you to consider why a support group may work for you. If you would like information about joining our WVPTI's Parent Strong support group, please contact us at 304-472-5697 or email wvpti@aol.com.

Workshop Descriptions

Below is a sampling of some of our most requested trainings and workshops. We constantly update and review to provide the latest information possible. If you do not find what you need, please ask.

ADHD

ADHD

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity...

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It will explore the symptoms and how the school accommodations or modifications can be an effective change for your child.

This workshop provides:

  • What is ADHD?
  • What are the symptoms?
  • How is it diagnosed?
  • How to help your child at home?
  • What accommodations or modifications can help at school?
  • How does ADHD affect social interactions?
  • Where can parents find help?

This 60-minute workshop offers parents, caregivers and other interested people the information to find out more about these topics and help their child(ren) be successful at home, in school, and in the community.

Basic Guide 504/IEP

Basic Guide 504/IEP

The federal government has Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for children with disabilities to...

The federal government has Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for children with disabilities to protect them from acts of discrimination and exclusion due to a disability. Are you thinking about joining us? Has your child ever been excluded from a field trip or school event due to behavior? Does your child's disability meet the guidelines under the IDEA Special Education Act? If you are asking any of these questions, this workshop is for you. You will have the opportunity to discuss the special supports for a child with a disability to ensure success in school.

Collaborative Communication

Collaborative Communication

How well do you communicate about your child's needs? Does your child have an educational plan that...

How well do you communicate about your child's needs? Does your child have an educational plan that is not being carried out and you want to know how the communicate your frustrations? If these questions apply to you, we invite you to attend this workshop. It will assist you to learn about your part in your child's special education plan, including the skills you need to work with the school's personnel to develop an appropriate education program (IEP) for your child and what you can do if you are having difficulty making the special education process work.

ESSA- It's the Law! Workshop

ESSA- It's the Law! Workshop

The ESSA (Every Child Succeeds Act) Workshop is to aid parents, educational leaders and the...

The ESSA (Every Child Succeeds Act) Workshop is to aid parents, educational leaders and the community members to understand the changes and policy implications of this new law. It provides a forum for participants to discuss how this law affects the education of the children of West Virginia. Participants will learn:

  • Accountability by the state and county for the children's education
  • Federal funding and local responsibilities.
  • Interventions and supports provided by the new law.
  • How schools will provide an equal and adequate education under ESSA
  • Overview of what the law allows and specifically, what parents may expect.

The workshop's participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about ESSA.

First Steps .... Basic Rights

First Steps .... Basic Rights

Are you a parent of a child who might have special needs? Are you interested in gaining knowledge...

Are you a parent of a child who might have special needs? Are you interested in gaining knowledge of the special education laws, including your role in the development of an appropriate education program (IEP) and how to be an effective partner in the school team process? Come and join us to gain a working knowledge of special education law at our workshop.

IEP Process

IEP Process

In this workshop, parents/participants learn the effective ways to become an involved member of the...

In this workshop, parents/participants learn the effective ways to become an involved member of the IEP Process for their child. The parents/participants will have a better understanding of the steps, the role of parents, and the meaning of each part of the plan. If the parent brings a current copy of their child's IEP, the trainer will review and answer questions about that plan.

Overview of Special Education Process

Overview of Special Education Process

This presentation will explain the IEP process to ensure parents are prepared and what to expect...

This presentation will explain the IEP process to ensure parents are prepared and what to expect during this educational option for their child. The workshop will take the participants through:

  • Background of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
  • Definition of Disability
  • Guiding Principles of IDEA
  • Process of referral, evaluations, timelines, re-evaluations and parental right to Independent Educational Evaluations (IEE)
  • Transition Planning

Pre-K Transition Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) to IEP (Individual Education Plan)

Pre-K Transition Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) to IEP (Individual Education Plan)

This workshop explores the changing process of the Pre-K transition of the Individual Family...

This workshop explores the changing process of the Pre-K transition of the Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) to an IEP
(Individual Education Plan). The parents will explore the current educational procedures and when your child needs an IEP. The workshop will involve:

  • Basic Rights information regarding services and protections available for children under IDEA-¬≠Birth to Three (Early Intervention- Part C) & Age 3 and Up: Special Education (Part B)
  • What to expect when a child is transitioning from services at age 3 to services in the school system
  • Information on other transition such as from preschool to kindergarten
  • Details about an appropriate IFSP (Individual Family Service Plan); IEP (Individual Education Program)

WVPTI invites you to learn about your part in your child's education at this important stage of early childhood.

Transition- Stairway to Success

Transition- Stairway to Success

Your child's future into adulthood is closer than you think. It is never too early to start...

Your child's future into adulthood is closer than you think. It is never too early to start planning. Forget about the magic number of 14 being the time to plan ... today is the first day to start planning for the rest of your child's life! This workshop will teach you the five powerful strategies for steering your child's life to high expectations of a future.

Tourette's Syndrome

Tourette's Syndrome

This workshop offers participants an overview of Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders, their impact...

This workshop offers participants an overview of Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders, their impact on student learning and management in school settings. If you are a parent, educator, individual who is interested in this topic, you need to attend this workshop. Learn why effective communication with school administrators and your child's 'team' is essential to helping your child succeed.

Transition

Planning on Transitions

Click a heading below to expand and learn more.

Transition means moving from one stage or place to another

Examples of transition are when your child moves from an early intervention program to preschool, from one grade to another or from one kind of educational placement to another. Moving from high school into the adult world is another big transition. There are also times when a student experiences a major life change outside of the school setting (for example, a serious illness or death in the family) that impacts their learning and may trigger the need for transition planning.

All transitions have several things in common

Whether your child is transitioning into preschool or college, his or her transition will have these three things in common:

  • a period of uncertainty and questioning about the future
  • a change in the support system for your child (new teachers, friends, service providers, etc.)
  • an increase in anxiety
Planning ahead helps make transitions smoother

Transitions require some advance planning in order to make the move less hectic, more efficient and successful. They also require the input and support of your child's IEP team.

Invest in Yourself

By the time your child gets into intermediate/middle school, transition planning for adulthood is included in the IEP

Beginning at age 16 (or younger if appropriate), your child's IEP will include a focus on what courses are needed to match up with your child's future goals. By age 16, the IEP will also include appropriate, measurable goals for after high school that are based on your child's strengths, interests and age-appropriate transition assessments. The plan should state what services are needed to transition successfully into college, employment and/or living in the community. Transition services may include actual training (for example, job training or independent living skills training), as well as links to adult service agencies that provide services to the student after high school.

Dream Big

Transition planning for students (age 16 and older) looks at their needs they may have as adults

There are at least 10 areas that should be considered in planning for the future:

  1. Adult, vocational or higher education
  2. Employment
  3. Financial Support
  4. Health Care
  5. Living Arrangements
  6. Transportation
  7. Social Networks
  8. Recreation or Leisure Activites
  9. Legal representation (for example, guardianship or Power of Attorney)
  10. Self-advocacy skills needed by your child

Career

Make sure your child is actively involved in planning his or her life

Self-determination means living a life of your own choosing. When planning for transition, it is essential that you and your child's teachers take the time to understand your child's choices and life preferences. The more your child relates to the transition plan, the more he or she will be invested in working toward future goals.

Self Determination

Encourage your child to speak up at the IEP meeting

Having your child at the IEP table is an excellent way to keep team members focused on the impact of their decisions. Talk with your child about her or his needs and desires before the meeting to build confidence toward participating as a full team member. All students need to learn self-advocacy skills. Ask your child's teachers if some self-advocacy skills can be taught in the classroom.

Your child has the right to make all educational decisions when he or she turns 18

When a student with a disability reaches the age of 18 (called the age of majority), all rights that have been granted to parents under IDEA transfer to the student. That means that your child, and not you, has the right to consent to services or refuse them and has the right to utilize due process options, like mediation and due process hearing requests.

Your adult child can give you or someone else the right to make decisions through a limited Power of Attorney

Sometimes students prefer for their parents to continue being the advocate on their behalf, or they may want a friend or another trusted adult. This process can be completed through a Power of Attorney for Special Education. Your child will name his or her agent in writing, and have two witnesses for the signing of the document or have it notarized.

A guardian or an educational representative can be appointed

"Decisional capacity" refers to an adult student being able to understand, reason and act on his or her own behalf. If the student lacks decisional capacity, it means they are unable to provide informed consent for their educational program. Some parents will opt to become their child's legal guardian. This process requires going to court and having a judge declare your child legally incompetent to make certain decisions for himself or herself. Another option that doesn't require legal action is to become your child's educational representative for special education purposes. It is required to have a written statement by a qualified professional (a physician, psychologist, psychiatrist, a representative from the Developmental Disabilities Division, etc.) that your child lacks decisional capacity due to his or her disability.

A Summary of Performance is given when your child leaves school

It is intended for post high school planning to include academic achievement and functional performance information such as: final report card, progress reports from the IEP, recent scores in reading and math, and skill levels related to communication, independent living, mobility and social skills (as appropriate).